About Lindsey McClave

Lindsey McClave

Lindsey McClave has a deep love for food, wine and travel. While she has no intentions of becoming a chef or a sommelier and doesn't consider herself an expert in any culinary area, she is obsessed with learning.

She says, "the one thing I've taken away from my wine travels is that wine is meant for everyone - rich, poor, and everywhere in-between.” Whatever cooking becomes to you, she encourages you to find that foodie place, embrace it and run with it.


Latest Posts by Lindsey McClave

Give Yourself the Gift of Learning Chinese Cooking

December 10, 2014 by  

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Egg rolls fall into that category of food I find far too intimidating to tackle.  Outside of the steady and practiced hand required to assemble these perfect little packages, my complete lack of familiarity with the flavors and seasonings of Chinese cuisine left me feeling unsure of where to start.

After a fair amount of practice rolling spring rolls and the nagging desire to finally dip my toe into the vast and varied world of Chinese cooking, I pushed my fear of failing aside, accepting that, as with many first time recipe attempts, the end result would be a burnt and broken mess of egg roll wrappers, not-quite-cooked-through filling and a grease-splattered stove.

So I tentatively read a few recipes, bought my first bottle of fish sauce and set about assembling an approachable blend of ingredients for my first egg roll filling: minced shallots and garlic for a flavorful base, shredded carrots for a touch of sweetness, diced serrano peppers for heat and rice noodles to act as a binding agent of sort, a vehicle for sauce absorption wrapping and intertwining with large bites of shrimp and sausage.

Tossed with fish sauce, sugar, soy sauce and lime juice, I held my breath as I sealed the filling into my first egg roll, cringing with anticipation, waiting for the wrapper to split, for everything to fall apart.

To my surprise and delight the egg roll assembly proved to be simple and I was able to move along efficiently, pleased with the rhythm I soon found and the beautiful string of mini egg rolls lining up beside me.  A quick fry and Z and I were crunching into these flavorful pockets, ample pieces of just cooked through shrimp and sausage supported by a base of salty-sweet veggies and noodles.  With one recipe under my belt I am excited to immerse myself in this revered cuisine.  Grand flavors await.

Place the following in a large bowl: one half cup minced shallots, two cloves minced garlic (approximately one and one half tsp), one half cup grated carrots (approximately one large carrot, grated), two serrano chills, minced, and five ounces rice noodles, cooked in boiling salted water for three minutes and strained, running under cold water to stop the cooking.

Add one half pound peeled and deveined shrimp (rough chop, leaving plenty of large bites) and one half pound pork sausage to the vegetables and noodles.

Pour two tbs fish sauce, two tsp sugar, one tbs soy sauce, one tsp freshly squeezed lime juice and one half tsp freshly ground black pepper over the vegetables, shrimp and sausage.  Toss to combine thoroughly.

Time to assemble!  You will need to have an egg wash handy to seal the egg roll.  Beat one egg with a splash of water.  Place close to your assembly area, with a pasty brush handy for application.  Egg roll wrappers generally come in squares.  I like to cut them down the center, at a diagonal, forming two small triangles.  With the base of the triangle facing toward you, brush the sides of the wrapper with the egg wash.  Place a spoonful of the filling in the center of the triangle, toward the base.

Fold both ends of the base of the triangle inward, sealing on top of one another.  Carefully roll the base of the triangle away from you, pulling it up and over itself, pushing the filling into the packet and sealing the top of the triangle to the wrapper.  Set aside and continue assembling the egg rolls.

Fill a heavy-bottom pot with three inches of canola oil.  Heat to 375 degrees and carefully place the egg rolls into the oil, being careful not to overcrowd.  You will need to work in batches and to keep a close eye on the temperature of the oil.

Each batch of egg rolls will cook in four to five minutes.  The temperature of the oil will drop when the egg rolls are added, however the more batches of egg rolls you fry, the hotter the oil will become over time.  I have a candy thermometer and find it to be the best tool for tracking the temperature of my oil.  Once crisp and brown, remove the egg rolls to a plate lined with a paper towel, allowing any excess grease to drain.

Serve the egg rolls with a sweet chili sauce for dipping.  Enjoy!

Makes 18-20 Small Egg Rolls

  • one half cup minced shallots
  • two cloves minced garlic (approximately one and one half tsp)
  • one half cup grated carrots (approximately one large carrot, grated)
  • two serrano chills, minced
  • five ounces rice noodles, cooked in boiling salted water for three minutes and strained, running under cold water to stop the cooking
  • one half pound peeled and deveined shrimp (rough chop, leaving plenty of large bites)
  • one half pound pork sausage
  • two tbs fish sauce
  • two tsp sugar
  • one tbs soy sauce
  • one tsp freshly squeezed lime juice
  • one half tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • one egg, beaten with a splash of water (to be used for egg wash for sealing egg roll wrappers)
  • 10 egg roll wrappers, cut diagonally into small triangles
Place the shallots, garlic, carrots, serrano chills and rice noodles in a large bowl.  Add the shrimp, sausage, fish sauce, sugar, soy sauce, lime juice and black pepper to the bowl.  Toss to combine thoroughly.
Time to assemble!  You will need to have an egg wash handy to seal the egg roll.  Beat one egg with a splash of water.  Place close to your assembly area, with a pasty brush handy for application.  Egg roll wrappers generally come in squares.  I like to cut them down the center, at a diagonal, forming two small triangles.  With the base of the triangle facing toward you, brush the sides of the wrapper with the egg wash.  Place a spoonful of the filling in the center of the triangle, toward the base.
 Fold both ends of the base of the triangle inward, sealing on top of one another.  Carefully roll the base of the triangle away from you, pulling it up and over itself, pushing the filling into the packet and sealing the top of the triangle to the wrapper.  Set aside and continue assembling the egg rolls.
Fill a heavy-bottom pot with three inches of canola oil.  Heat to 375 degrees and carefully place the egg rolls into the oil, being careful not to overcrowd.  You will need to work in batches and to keep a close eye on the temperature of the oil.  Each batch of egg rolls will cook in four to five minutes.
 The temperature of the oil will drop when the egg rolls are added, however the more batches of egg rolls you fry, the hotter the oil will become over time.  I have a candy thermometer and find it to be the best tool for tracking the temperature of my oil.  Once crisp and brown, remove the egg rolls to a plate lined with a paper towel, allowing any excess grease to drain.  Serve the egg rolls with a sweet chili sauce for dipping.  Enjoy!

 

 

Making Old Fashioned Pizza But With Leeks + Bacon

November 17, 2014 by  

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While I am an unabashed lover of pizza, I tend to be a purist when it comes to my favorite food.  I’m more or less addicted to my marinara recipe and think it is the ideal base for a building any pie.  A recent freelance assignment challenged me to craft a pizza fit for the fall season and I found myself playing with brussels sprouts and bacon, realizing that a tomato sauce would not allow these ingredients to fully express themselves.  The crust would need a healthy dose of cream, infused and enhanced with garlic and rosemary.
After several test runs I was officially a white-pizza convert, the richness and comfort-inducing qualities of the bubbling cream a quintessential partner for the bacon and brussels sprouts.  This pizza takes that same creamy base and tops it with earthy mushrooms and delicate leeks, both charring perfectly in the blistering hot oven, mozzarella and blue cheese melting alongside while slivers of bacon crisp and brown.  It is decadent and familiar, a warm embrace of fall to help take the edge off these cool, pre-winter nights.
  

A pizza is only as good as it’s crust and I happen to really like my dough recipe.  To begin, place one and one thirds cup very hot tap water in the bowl of a stand mixer.  Add one packet of active dry yeast to the water along with one tbs of sugar.  Mix with your hand so that the sugar dissolves and then allow to sit at room temperature for ten minutes.  The yeast will activate (also known as ‘proofing’) and bubbles will form on the water.  Sift three and three quarter cups all purpose flower directly into the yeast mixture along with one tbs table salt.  Add two tbs olive oil to the bowl.

Using the dough hook, mix the flour and yeast on low speed for three to five minutes until well blended and you can see the dough begin to come together.  Roll the dough out onto a clean surface and knead with your hands for an additional four to five minutes until the dough ball becomes smooth and elastic.  Drizzle one tbs of olive oil into a large bowl and place the dough ball into the bowl.

Turn the ball around and flip it over, ensuring all sides are covered with the oil.  Cover with saran wrap and allow to rest at room temperature for one to one and one half hours.  Once the dough has doubled in size, roll it out onto the counter and cut it in half.  This recipe yields two 12″ pizzas.  The dough balls may be frozen at this point, if you prefer.  If using that same day, allow the individual dough ball to rest for an additional 15 minutes before rolling out into the crust.

Another key piece to a fantastic pizza is how you bake the crust.  I put my pizza stone on the baking rack and I crank my oven up to 500 degrees (you want to be sure your oven is very clean to heat it this high).
Allow the oven to preheat and warm at 500 for one hour so that the stone is flaming hot when it’s time to bake the pizza.

While the pizza dough is resting prep the toppings.  Slice two pieces of bacon into quarter-inch strips.  Sauté the bacon in one tsp of olive oil until the fat is rendered and it is just beginning to crisp but is not fully cooked.  Remove to a plate lined with a paper towel and set aside.

Roughly chop enough baby portobello mushrooms to fill three quarters of a cup.  Slice the root end from one leek and split length-wise.  Rinse thoroughly under cold running water, pulling the layers apart to make sure all of the sand is removed.  Slice thinly.  Set aside.

Time for the sauce!  Pour one cup of heavy cream into a small sauté pan.  Add two cloves garlic, minced, one half tsp kosher salt, one quarter freshly ground black pepper and one stem rosemary.  Stir to combine and bring to a low simmer.  Stir frequently, allowing the cream to reduce and thicken for ten minutes.  Make sure to keep the heat low so that the cream doesn’t burn.

I nearly always use whole mozzarella, sliced thinly for my pizzas.  I added crumbled bleu cheese to the mix as it makes great friends with the mushrooms, bacon and leeks.  Slice the mozzarella and set aside.

It’s time to build our pie!  Liberally flour your counter so that the dough will not stick when you are rolling it out.  Flour your rolling pin as well and begin to carefully form the dough ball into a thin, round pizza crust, approximately one quarter inch thick and twelve inches in diameter.  If you have a pizza peel feel free to add the toppings to your pizza here and then transfer it to the pizza stone.  I prefer to roll the dough around my rolling pin and then to unroll it onto the pizza stone, which I’ve removed from the oven to the top of my stove.  The dough will quickly begin to bubble and puff up on the hot surface.

Spoon the garlic and rosemary infused cream onto the crust and spread into an even layer.  Top with half of the mushrooms and leeks.

Add half of the bacon to the top of the pie.

Place the slices of mozzarella in an even layer over top of the pizza.  Sprinkle with bleu cheese and remaining leeks, mushrooms and bacon.  Add a pinch of kosher salt over top of the pizza – no more than a quarter tsp.  While the bacon and cream sauce offer plenty of saltiness, the veggies have not been seasoned and the mozzarella always responds nicely to a little bit of salt.

Bake for eight to ten minutes until the cheese is brown and bubbly.  Remove from the oven and allow to rest for three minutes before slicing.  Enjoy!

Makes One Twelve Inch Pizza

  • one ball pizza dough (see recipe below)
  • two slices bacon
  • one leek
  • three quarters cup chopped baby portobello mushrooms
  • one cup heavy cream
  • one stem rosemary
  • two cloves garlic, minced
  • one half tsp kosher salt
  • one quarter tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • one half pound fresh mozzarella, sliced thin
  • two ounces bleu cheese, crumbled
  • additional kosher salt for seasoning
Pizza Dough (recipe yields dough for two twelve inch pizzas)
  • one packet active dry yeast
  • one tbs sugar
  • one and one third cup hot tap water
  • three and three quarter quarter cups all purpose flour
  • one tbs table salt
  • two tbs olive oil

A pizza is only as good as it’s crust and I happen to really like my dough recipe.  To begin, place one and one thirds cup very hot tap water in the bowl of a stand mixer.  Add one packet of active dry yeast to the water along with one tbs of sugar.  Mix with your hand so that the sugar dissolves and then allow to sit at room temperature for ten minutes.  The yeast will activate (also known as ‘proofing’) and bubbles will form on the water.  Sift three and three quarter cups all purpose flower directly into the yeast mixture along with one tbs table salt.  Add two tbs olive oil to the bowl.  Using the dough hook, mix the flour and yeast on low speed for three to five minutes until well blended and you can see the dough begin to come together.  Roll the dough out onto a clean surface and knead with your hands for an additional four to five minutes until the dough ball becomes smooth and elastic.  Drizzle one tbs of olive oil into a large bowl and place the dough ball into the bowl.  Turn the ball around and flip it over, ensuring all sides are covered with the oil.  Cover with saran wrap and allow to rest at room temperature for one to one and one half hours.  Once the dough has doubled in size, roll it out onto the counter and cut it in half.  This recipe yields two 12″ pizzas.  The dough balls may be frozen at this point, if you prefer.  If using that same day, allow the individual dough ball to rest for an additional 15 minutes before rolling out into the crust.

Another key piece to a fantastic pizza is how you bake the crust.  I put my pizza stone on the baking rack and I crank my oven up to 500 degrees (you want to be sure your oven is very clean to heat it this high).  Allow the oven to preheat and warm at 500 for one hour so that the stone is flaming hot when it’s time to bake the pizza.

Pizza with Mushrooms, Bacon & Leeks
While the pizza dough is resting prep the toppings.  Slice two pieces of bacon into quarter-inch strips.  Sauté the bacon in one tsp of olive oil until the fat is rendered and it is just beginning to crisp but is not fully cooked.  Remove to a plate lined with a paper towel and set aside.
Roughly chop enough baby portobello mushrooms to fill three quarters of a cup.  Slice the root end from one leek and split length-wise.  Rinse thoroughly under cold running water, pulling the layers apart to make sure all of the sand is removed.  Slice thinly.  Set aside.
Time for the sauce!  Pour one cup of heavy cream into a small sauté pan.  Add two cloves garlic, minced, one half tsp kosher salt, one quarter freshly ground black pepper and one stem rosemary.  Stir to combine and bring to a low simmer.  Stir frequently, allowing the cream to reduce and thicken for ten minutes.  Make sure to keep the heat low so that the cream doesn’t burn.
I nearly always use whole mozzarella, sliced thinly for my pizzas.  I added crumbled bleu cheese to the mix as it makes great friends with the mushrooms, bacon and leeks.  Slice the mozzarella and set aside.
It’s time to build our pie!  Liberally flour your counter so that the dough will not stick when you are rolling it out.  Flour your rolling pin as well and begin to carefully form the dough ball into a thin, round pizza crust, approximately one quarter inch thick and twelve inches in diameter.  If you have a pizza peel feel free to add the toppings to your pizza here and then transfer it to the pizza stone.  I prefer to roll the dough around my rolling pin and then to unroll it onto the pizza stone, which I’ve removed from the oven to the top of my stove.  The dough will quickly begin to bubble and puff up on the hot surface.
Spoon the garlic and rosemary infused cream onto the crust and spread into an even layer.  Top with half of the mushrooms and leeks.  Add half of the bacon to the top of the pie.
Place the slices of mozzarella in an even layer over top of the pizza.  Sprinkle with bleu cheese and remaining leeks, mushrooms and bacon.  Add a pinch of kosher salt over top of the pizza – no more than a quarter tsp.  While the bacon and cream sauce offer plenty of saltiness, the veggies have not been seasoned and the mozzarella always responds nicely to a little bit of salt.
Bake for eight to ten minutes until the cheese is brown and bubbly.  Remove from the oven and allow to rest for three minutes before slicing.  Enjoy!

 

2 Bourbon Cocktail Inspirations For Your List

November 3, 2014 by  

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Halfway to Derby - Inspired by the mint julep, this stirred cocktail is a perfect drink for a cold winter evening in the Bluegrass, as we begin the annual downhill slide toward the first Saturday in May.  
Recipe by Z
4 oz. Mint Lemongrass Tea-Infused Bourbon (see below)
.5 oz Simple Syrup
3 dashes peach bitters
1 lemon twist
Rinse a chilled coupe glass with peach bitters and dump.  Stir the infused bourbon and simple syrup over ice, then strain into coupe.  Squeeze the lemon twist over the drink and garnish.
Mint Lemograss Green Tea-Infused Bourbon

recipe adapted from the Death & Co Cocktail Book

Individual serving:
In a container, combine a heaping ½ tablespoon of loose mint lemongrass tea and 4 oz. bourbon and stir well.  Let stand at room temperature for 1 hour and 45 minutes, stirring occasionally.  Strain through a cheesecloth-lined sieve.

New York City: It’s Almost All About the Food

September 2, 2014 by  

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It is an inevitable feeling, one that leaves me all twisted up inside every time we board a plane/train/automobile and make the trek back to Louisville from wherever our travels have taken us.  I don’t want to leave.  I want to go back.  I need to go back.

This feeling was ever apparent on our recent trip to New York City.  Despite an unexpected third night to explore, my mind and soul were left parched, and the thirst to return is palpable, almost all-consuming.  The thing about New York City is that it is virtually impossible to scratch the surface in one weekend.  But do you even do so in a lifetime?  It’s varied corners and pockets of people seem endless, the city moving forward at a rapid pace and remaining rooted in history all at the same time.  It is a beautifully overwhelming place to visit and the desire to return is a confliction I am happy to possess.

Z and I were inundated with recommendations of where to go, what to eat and what to drink.  Everyone has a strong opinion about New York City and everyone has an all-time favorite restaurant.  A spot that spoke to them the loudest, that left an indelible impression on their heart.  I wanted to go to all of these haunts and then some but alas that was impossible.  Instead we remained focused on a few key restaurants and would fill the time in between meals walking and absorbing our surroundings.  Since we couldn’t be everywhere we resolved to be in the moment.  And we had some fantastic moments.

The first of which occurred as soon as we arrived in the city.  We landed at LaGuardia at 9pm, took a quick cab ride straight to our home base in the East Village, The Standard, refreshed and hit the pavement by 10:15.  Our first stop: Prune.

It is a shoebox of a restaurant, no more than two dozen patrons accommodated at once.  The kitchen sits square in the back, much, much smaller than what I had conjored in my mind when reading Blood, Bones and Butter, Chef and Owner Gabrielle Hamilton’s self-penned recounting of her life and the food that shaped it.  However unlike a book you read prior to seeing the movie, only to find the movie has portrayed the characters and stories in a grossely inacurate manner, I was a bit taken aback when Z and I stepped through the open doors of Prune.  It was even better than I had imagined.

The menu is concise and well-constructed, making the decision for the diner that much more of a challenge as you quickly find yourself wanting to order one of everything, the idea of selecting one of the four entrees nearly impossible.  It just so happened that we came to Prune on a night they were introducing a new menu, and, after much debate and some disappointment over the fact that both the pasta starter and the cold roast beef with lettuces were sold out, we settled on a spicy chicken soup, Gabrielle’s play on pasole, to begin our meal.

Our first course was followed by the fried rabbit with buttermilk dressing and onions and the ‘fish taco,’ an artful take on a classic, the crispy skinned catch of the day layered atop a crunchy, paper-thin flatbread and topped with mixed herbs and peppery radish.

As our varied selections posed a bit of a wine conundrum, we were delighted to find a bottle of 2004 Lopez de Heredia Viura, a ten year old bottle that is a rich and unusual white wine with an almost port-like quality, offering enough body to hold up to the chicken and rabbit and a bright acidity to accentuate the fish.  It was also the perfect pair for our fantastically simplistic dessert of fresh peaches served on crisp, buttered bread, confectioners sugar coaxing out the natural sweetness of the fruit.

Saturday morning brought along a short stroll to Russ and Daughters, a 100 year old classic seafood deli located on East Houston Street in the Lower East Side.  If you’ve watched many cooking or travel shows, chances are you’re already familiar with this NYC staple, however it manages to retain every ounce of it’s natural charm, refusing to change regardless of the fame and attention their expertly cured fish and pickled herring have brought upon them.

We sandwiched our way into the store, fitting snuggly between two long deli cases, one a rainbow of smoked salmon, trout, sturgeon and herring, the other a sampling of confections of old.  Mounds of house made cream cheese play with your imagination, looking more like freshly spun gelato than the schmere for a bagel.

I resisted the urge to go against my gut and stuck with my plan to order the classic smoked salmon sandwich, selecting Scottish salmon, plain cream cheese and a plain bagel with onions and capers.  Z was thankfully more adventurous and requested the Fancy Delancy sandwich, a unique layering of smoked tuna with wasabi flying fish roe and horseradish-dill cream cheese.  We wiggled our way through the crowd of waiting customers and took our breakfast on the road, hailing a cab to Central Park.

We strolled the expansive park until we found a cozy nook and we dug into our sandwiches.  Mine, while simple, was a shining example of why the trinity of smoked salmon, cream cheese and bagels came to be in the first place.  The salmon was silky, salty and rich, the cream cheese soothing and light.

The bagel had wonderful texture.  I was in smoked fish heaven.  Z enjoyed his selection as well, the wasabi flying fish roe offering that distinctive pop, an addictive textural element that complimented the spicy cream cheese and highlighted the thinly sliced tuna.  After lunch we set our sights on Eataly, beginning the hike across town with a long walk through Central Park.  We marveled at the thousands of people who were occupying this expansive and famous space.  The serenity of the park was refreshing and calming.  There was plenty of room for everyone to stretch out, relax, and escape the hustle and bustle.

The lush greenery slowly began to fade as we exited the outskirts of the park and reentered the throngs of people rushing about the streets of New York.  We made the three mile walk to Eataly, strolling through Times Square along the way.

Originating in Italy, the aptly named Eataly was brought to America by celebrity Chef Mario Batali.  It is difficult to describe Eataly as it multifaceted, the only overarching commonality being it’s devotion to the foods of Italy.  A celebration of all things Italian, Eataly is a hybrid market-meets-restaurant-meets-wineshop-meets-bookstore-meets-specialty-foodstore.

There are five aisles dedicated to pasta alone.  You can find nearly every olive oil in world at Eataly.  There is an entire shop dedicated to Nutella for crying out loud!  Upon entry, my initial reaction was to turn and leave.  There was too much to see and it felt too confusing.  But we elbowed our way through the crowd waiting in line to select their scoop from at least thirty different flavors of gelato, and entered the belly of the beast.

Several exposed kitchens from the various restaurants located in Eataly were buzzing, orders being shouted between servers and Chefs at the pass, countless individuals standing at a ham bar indulging in Italy’s finest cured meats, the clinking of wine glasses ringing through the air.  We settled in at the bar of Il Pesce and enjoyed freshly grilled shrimp and slices of raw tuna drizzled with olive oil and sprinkled with flaky black sea salt.  It was a perfect pick me up after our three mile trek and was just light enough to help us continue on for another three miles, as we made our way back through the street of New York to The Standard in the East Village.

I would go back to The Standard in a second for the service, the amenities and the great location.  But the view – THE VIEW!  That is more than reason enough to book this hotel during your next New York City jaunt.  Within walking distance of countless bars and restaurants, we set out for some pre-dinner libations.  We were happy to find two seats at the bar at Terroir, a wine-centric watering hole which dubs itself as the ‘elitist bar for everyone.’  Z had discovered this cozy wine temple during a recent business trip to New York and we enjoyed some German sparkling to kick off our second night in the city.  It was going to be one to remember.

And then, there was Ko.  The most intimate in David Chang’s series of New York City staples, Ko is unlike any other restaurant Z and I have ever experienced.  Nestled behind a decorative iron door, marked only with the eponymous peach, the singular bar of Ko stretches the length of the room, providing seating for only 12 patrons at one time.
This dining experience is made all the more intimate by the three masterful Chefs working on the opposite side of the bar, the full kitchen on display as if you had been invited into someone’s home.  You are entirely ensconced in what is happening in front of you, deft hands working quickly and efficiently as sauces are simmered, fish is seared and beef is charred over a blisteringly delicious flame.
Ordering alcohol always leaves me a bit befuddled during a meal of this length and magnitude, an unknown (but sure to be plentiful) number of courses awaiting our consumption.  Z and I enlisted the advice of the hostess – “champagne and beer” she replied, without missing a beat.  And so it was.  Twelve courses later I had savored thinly sliced mackerel layered over watermelon, black sesame and kimchi, was given goosebumps by the perfect pearls of handmade tortellini stuffed with peas and paired with crab and almond, and had eaten the best egg dish of my life.  Soft boiled, the egg is sliced open on the plate, the viscosity of the yolk just right, pouring ever so gently onto the dish.  Caviar dotted the brilliant yellow, miniature potato chips provided crunch and salt.
Z and I both agreed that the egg course was easily one of our top ten best bites.  What really made the dinner was the interaction we had with the Team, Chef Jay patiently answering each and every question I peppered his way.  My only complaint about the dinner is that it was too short, the 12 courses passing in a flash while we were entranced by the show being put on in front of us.  I simply didn’t want to leave.
The next day we meandered our way to Estela for brunch.  I had heard nothing but effusive praise for this relatively new and self-coined ‘beverage driven restaurant’ tucked away on Houston Street.
The menu comes off as simplistic, however there is much more to each dish than the sum of the few deceivingly simple items noted.  The blood cake with onion marmalade and egg was as complex as it was homey and comforting, the cake lightly caramelized around the edges while the yolk mixed and mingled with the slow cooked and practically candied onions making up the jam.  A lighter than air dollop of fresh burrata cheese topped our second dish, a charred baguette soaking up bracingly fresh salsa verde.  From texture to taste I wouldn’t have changed a thing.
My favorite dish of the meal came in the form of fried arroz negro with squid and romesco.  The crispy rice and squid ink took me back to a seaside table in Barcelona, the cool breeze from the ocean whispering against my skin as I dipped my fork into the paella pan.  We recapped our adventures from the evening prior, laughing as we recounted the many comedic moments we were treated to courtesy of the lineup at the The Comedy Cellar.  A veritable institution and training ground, many of the most popular comedians of past and present have honed their craft on the tiny stage located under ground off of MacDougal Street.  We arrived early and found a spot at the bar at The Fat Black Pussycat, which is located just above the theater.
 Our bartender was friendly and attentive, and, after friendly conversation, promised to secure two front row seats for us when our show time arrived.  Each night the Comedy Cellar presents a lineup of up-and-coming standup artists peppered with spontaneous appearances from veterans such as Louis CK, Dave Chappell, Chris Rock and Jerry Seinfeld.  The bar was lively and it didn’t take us long to notice the small gathering of comedians seated at the table directly behind us, Aziz Ansari (best known for his role on NBC’s 30 Rock) quietly reading through a small notebook.
We laughed for a solid hour and a half that night, watching 15 minute sets from brave new comedians giving it their all and more practiced artists like Aziz who were trying out new bits, playing with jokes and various angles to see how they passed with this intimate crowd.  With tickets a mere $24, the Comedy Cellar has landed at the top of our must-do list for any and all return trips to NYC.

 

Our original plans to return to Louisville Sunday evening were unexpectedly stymied just as we were prepared to head to LaGuardia.  Our flight had been canceled and our only option was to catch the first return trip on the docket for Monday morning.  The Standard accommodated our quick return and we decided to head over to Bar Ssam for a mid-afternoon snack of steamed buns with pork belly, hoisin, cucumber and scallion, blackened bluefish with miso, chips and pickles and tempura soft-shell crab with pimento cheese, green tomato and sesame seed.  
We jetted over to the West Side of the city to stroll the High Line, a long and winding park that sits above street level.  An ingenious repurposing of space, the High Line was built on a converted historic freight rail line.  
With plenty of grassy space and creative seating areas, we watched the sun set and allowed our appetite to build back up for our final dinner of the trip. L’Artusi had come highly recommended by a dear friend and former New Yorker. We sampled perfectly al dente bowls of pasta while admiring their unique wine offerings. As we rode back to our hotel post dinner I could sense my body fighting against itself. I was tired. I was full. My feet were beyond aching. I was overwhelmed by all that I had seen, by all that we had done in a few short days. And, while our lucky misfortune of a canceled flight had extended our stay, it was hard to accept that there was still so much to do, still so much to see. How could we possibly be leaving already? I am constantly having to accept the fact that I will never see it all, never do everything my wild little mind has conjured in my dreams. But that doesn’t mean I won’t try my damnedest. With that said, until next time, New York.

 

Having Fun With Meatballs, Spaghetti & Sauce

June 8, 2014 by  

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I love pasta.  Worcestershire sauce from Bourbon Barrel Foods and balsamic vinegar are added to the mix to enhance the natural flavors of the beef and breadcrumbs soaked in whole milk promise for a perfectly succulent and tender final product.  Make it a trifecta and pair with my recipe for fresh pasta and my go-to, easy-as-pie marinara sauce and you will have a locally grown meal that is as wholesome as it is impressive.  Enjoy!

To begin, place one quarter cup panko breadcrumbs in a small bowl.  Pour one quarter cup whole milk over the panko and allow to sit and absorb while you prep your veggies.  Over a twenty minute period the panko will soak up the milk, thickening and becoming very soft.  This will not only help bind the meatballs together but will also make sure there is plenty of moisture in the beef, keeping it from drying out while it cooks.

Turning to your cutting board, prep the following: one third cup minced shallots, one third cup finely diced carrots and three tsp minced garlic.  Set a pan over medium heat and warm.  Add one tbs of olive oil and heat for thirty seconds before adding your shallots and carrots to the pan.  Sauté the veggies for five to ten minutes until they have softened and the shallots are translucent.  Add the garlic and cook for one minute, until fragrant.  Remove from the heat and set aside.

Place one pound of ground sirloin in a large bowl and add the sautéed carrots, garlic and shallots along with the following: one large egg, one quarter teaspoon red pepper flakes, one teaspoon worcestershire sauce (I recommend Bourbon Barrel Foods), one teaspoon balsamic vinegar, one half teaspoon dried oregano, one third cup freshly grated parmesan cheese, one quarter teaspoon freshly ground black pepper and one half teaspoon kosher salt.

Use your hands to bring the mixture together until well blended.  Be cautious not to over mix.  You want to simply make sure the ingredients are distributed evenly throughout the meat.

Take approximately two tbs of the meat and roll into a small ball in the palm of your hand.  The meatballs will be just a bit over half of the size of a golf ball.  This recipe will yield 20-24 meatballs.  Once all of the beef mixture has been rolled out, place the meatballs on a plate and set in the refrigerator for twenty minutes to an hour.  We have both an egg and our moistened breadcrumbs in these meatballs, but the cool air from the fridge will ensure that they hold together and will not fall apart in the cooking process.

Warm a large sauté pan over medium heat and add one tbs of olive oil.  Allow the oil to heat for one minute and then carefully add the meatballs, one at a time.  Cook for five minutes on each side and then remove to a plate.  Tent with foil to keep warm.

Drain off any excess fat from the bottom of the pan and add your marinara sauce, dropping the heat to medium-low.  I highly recommend my quick and easy marinara recipe which you can find by clicking here.

While your marinara is warming, return the meatballs to the pan so they can warm back through and soak up a bit of the tomato goodness.  Cook your pasta (I also highly recommend my recipe for handmade pasta, which may be found by clicking here) and drain.

Remove the meatballs from the marinara and add the pasta directly to the sauce.  Toss to coat and cook for an additional minute over medium-low heat.  You should always let your pasta finish off the cooking process in the sauce so the flavors get to the very core of the noodle.  Plate the pasta and top with the meatballs.  Garnish with grated parmesan and freshly chopped basil and serve immediately.  Cheers!

Makes 20-24 Meatballs (Serves Four)

  • one pound Foxhollow Farm ground sirloin
  • one quarter cup panko breadcrumbs
  • one quarter cup whole milk
  • one third cup diced carrots
  • one third cup minced shallots
  • three tsp minced garlic
  • one large egg
  • one quarter tsp red pepper flakes
  • one half tsp dried oregano
  • one tsp worcestershire sauce (Bourbon Barrel Foods is recommended)
  • one tsp balsamic vinegar
  • one third cup freshly grated parmesan cheese
  • one quarter tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • one half tsp kosher salt
  • two tbs olive oil, divided
  • four cups marinara sauce (foodie-girl recipe found here)
  • one pound spaghetti (foodie-girl recipe found here)
  • freshly grated parmesan cheese and chopped basil for garnish

To begin, place one quarter cup panko breadcrumbs in a small bowl.  Pour one quarter cup whole milk over the panko and allow to sit and absorb while you prep your veggies.  Over a twenty minute period the panko will soak up the milk, thickening and becoming very soft.  This will not only help bind the meatballs together but will also make sure there is plenty of moisture in the beef, keeping it from drying out while it cooks.
Turning to your cutting board, prep the following: one third cup minced shallots, one third cup finely diced carrots and three tsp minced garlic.  Set a pan over medium heat and warm.  Add one tbs of olive oil and heat for thirty seconds before adding your shallots and carrots to the pan.  Sauté the veggies for five to ten minutes until they have softened and the shallots are translucent.  Add the garlic and cook for one minute, until fragrant.  Remove from the heat and set aside.
Place one pound of Foxhollow Farm ground sirloin in a large bowl and add the sautéed carrots, garlic and shallots along with the following: one large egg, one quarter tsp red pepper flakes, one tsp worcestershire sauce (I recommend Bourbon Barrel Foods), one tsp balsamic vinegar, one half tsp dried oregano, one third cup freshly grated parmesan cheese, one quarter tsp freshly ground black pepper and one half tsp kosher salt.
Use your hands to bring the mixture together until well blended.  Be cautious not to over mix.  You want to simply make sure the ingredients are distributed evenly throughout the meat.
Take approximately two tbs of the meat and roll into a small ball in the palm of your hand.  The meatballs will be just a bit over half of the size of a golf ball.  This recipe will yield 20-24 meatballs.  Once all of the beef mixture has been rolled out, place the meatballs on a plate and set in the refrigerator for twenty minutes to an hour.  We have both an egg and our moistened breadcrumbs in these meatballs, but the cool air from the fridge will ensure that they hold together and will not fall apart in the cooking process.
Warm a large sauté pan over medium heat and add one tbs of olive oil.  Allow the oil to heat for one minute and then carefully add the meatballs, one at a time.  Cook for five minutes on each side and then remove to a plate.  Tent with foil to keep warm.
Drain off any excess fat from the bottom of the pan and add your marinara sauce, dropping the heat to medium-low.  I highly recommend my quick and easy marinara recipe which you can find by clicking here.

While your marinara is warming, return the meatballs to the pan so they can warm back through and soak up a bit of the tomato goodness.  Cook your pasta (I also highly recommend my recipe for handmade pasta, which may be found by clicking here) and drain.  Remove the meatballs from the marinara and add the pasta directly to the sauce.  Toss to coat and cook for an additional minute over medium-low heat.  You should always let your pasta finish off the cooking process in the sauce so the flavors get to the very core of the noodle.  Plate the pasta and top with the meatballs.  Garnish with grated parmesan and freshly chopped basil and serve immediately.  Cheers!

 

 

A Southern Chicken & Bourbon Mustard BBQ Sauce

June 7, 2014 by  

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I am not sure why I have a penchant for mustard-based barbecue sauce but there is something about the tangy, bold nature of a sauce with a mustard backbone that acts as a defibrillator for my palate.   When I was posed with the challenge of creating a barbecue sauce utilizing Four Roses Small Batch Bourbon, I knew I would be bypassing the ketchup and reaching instead for the jar of yellow mustard in my fridge.

This was my first time dipping my toe in the world of barbecue and seeing as I live in a condo and do not have a grill, I wasn’t quite sure where to begin.  Chef Levon Wallace of Proof on Main offered me loads of expert advice and the result was a beautifully roasted, impossibly juicy chicken bathed in a spicy and bright mustard sauce, one that took me three tries to finally get right.

In keeping with what I’ve found in most recipes, creating the sauce was all about layering flavors and the Four Roses Small Batch gave me a fantastic profile with which to work.

This bourbon blend brings strong notes of spice which are quickly quelled by a light sweetness and pleasant viscosity.  Brought to a boil with shallots, garlic and jalapeño, any bite from the alcohol is removed, the base flavors remaining and enhanced, pacifying the abrasive nature of the mustard and brightening the notes given by the cumin and red pepper flakes.

Local Kentucky sorghum and brown sugar, a near must for any barbecue sauce, match the natural sweetness of the bourbon nose-to-nose, finishing out a beautifully flavored, bourbon inspired sauce.  At Levon’s advice, I had brined the chicken overnight to ensure the oven didn’t take away any of the natural juices.  After roasting for a bit until almost cooked through, the sauce is drenched over the chicken and baked on for the last few minutes of cooking time, sealing in the flavor and finishing off some of the best chicken I’ve ever cooked at home.

I tip my hat to those who have spent years perfecting the craft of barbecue.  It is a complicated and delicious culinary road to travel and I look forward to exploring the path, my bottle of bourbon in hand.

 

Chef Levon’s first piece of advice to me was to brine my chicken.  I had always thought brines were reserved for Thanksgiving turkeys and other special occasion preparations.  It was as simple as throwing together a marinade and goodness it made all the difference in the texture and flavor of the chicken.  You can flavor the brine as complexly as you’d like.

I kept mine simple and mixed the following in a very large bowl: eight cups of warm water, one quarter cup kosher salt plus an additional eighth of a cup, one quarter cup sugar plus an additional eighth of a cup, and one tbs red pepper flakes. Stir until all of the salt and sugar dissolves in the water.  Allow to cool to room temperature and then add the chicken quarters (the leg and thigh of the chicken, in one piece), ensuring they are completely submerged.  Refrigerate for six to 24 hours.

Pre-heat the oven to 425 degrees and remove the chicken from the brine.  Pat dry and place on a rimmed baking sheet.  Season with kosher salt, freshly cracked black pepper and drizzle with olive oil.  Roast in the oven for 35-40 minutes until the meat is nearly cooked through and the skin is beginning to brown and become slightly crisp (if you use a meat thermometer you are looking for a temperature of 140).

While the chicken is roasting make the sauce!  You can certainly make this sauce ahead of time.  It will last in the fridge for up to two weeks.  Begin by warming a medium pot over medium heat.

Add one tbs of olive oil and sauté the following: one jalapeño, minced, and one third cup of chopped onions.  Sauté until the vegetables become tender and the onion is translucent, about 10 minutes.  Add two cloves of garlic, finely minced, to the mix and stir for one minute until fragrant.  Now it is time for the piece de resistance: the Four Roses Small Batch.  Keeping the heat on medium, slowly add one cup of Four Roses to the pot.  This may flame up a bit, which is fine.  It is just the alcohol burning off.  Just be sure to go slowly and keep your face away from the pot.

Allow the bourbon to deglaze the pot, stirring and scraping the bottom with a wooden spoon.  Next up: the mustard!  Add one cup good quality yellow mustard to the Four Roses mixture, along with two tsp good quality dijon mustard.

Continue by adding the following: one half cup apple cider vinegar, one tsp ground cumin, one quarter tsp red pepper flakes, one tbs local Kentucky sorghum (local honey is a good substitute), two tbs brown sugar, one tsp Worcestershire sauce (Bourbon Barrel Foods’s Worcestershire sauce is my favorite), and one half tsp kosher salt.  Stir to combine and bring to a boil.

Once the sauce is boiling, drop the heat to medium-low and allow to simmer for twenty minutes, reducing the sauce and helping the flavors meld and concentrate.  Next, remove from the heat and strain the sauce through a fine sieve, separating out the jalapeño and onion and leaving you with a smooth, delicious barbecue sauce!

After the chicken has cooked for 35-40 minutes, remove from the oven and brush liberally with the bourbon-mustard sauce.  Drop the oven temperature to 350 degrees and put the chicken back in to roast for an additional 15 minutes.  The meat will finish cooking and the sauce will begin to set.  Remove from the oven and allow to rest for five to 10 minutes.  Serve along with additional bourbon-mustard on the side.  Enjoy!

Chicken to Serve Two, Recipe Yields One Cup of Sauce

The Chicken

  • two chicken quarters
  • eight cups warm water
  • one quarter cup kosher salt, plus an additional one eighth cup
  • one quarter cup sugar, plus an additional one eighth cup
  • one tbs red pepper flakes
  • one tsp olive oil
  • kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper for seasoning

Four Roses Bourbon-Mustard Sauce

  • one jalapeño, minced
  • one third cup chopped onion
  • two cloves garlic, finely minced
  • one cup Four Roses Small Batch bourbon
  • one cup good quality yellow mustard
  • two tsp good quality dijon mustard
  • one half cup apple cider vinegar
  • one tsp ground cumin
  • one quarter tsp red pepper flakes
  • one tbs local Kentucky sorghum (local honey is a good substitute)
  • two tbs brown sugar
  • one tsp Worcestershire sauce (Bourbon Barrel Foods’s Worcestershire sauce is my favorite)
  • one half tsp kosher salt

I had always thought brines were reserved for Thanksgiving turkeys and other special occasion preparations.  It was as simple as throwing together a marinade and goodness it made all the difference in the texture and flavor of the chicken.

You can flavor the brine as complexly as you’d like.  I kept mine simple and mixed the following in a very large bowl: eight cups of warm water, one quarter cup kosher salt plus an additional eighth of a cup, one quarter cup sugar plus an additional eighth of a cup, and one tbs red pepper flakes. Stir until all of the salt and sugar dissolves in the water.  Allow to cool to room temperature and then add the chicken quarters (the leg and thigh of the chicken, in one piece), ensuring they are completely submerged.  Refrigerate for six to 24 hours.
Pre-heat the oven to 425 degrees and remove the chicken from the brine.  Pat dry and place on a rimmed baking sheet.  Season with kosher salt, freshly cracked black pepper and drizzle with olive oil.  Roast in the oven for 35-40 minutes until the meat is nearly cooked through and the skin is beginning to brown and become slightly crisp (if you use a meat thermometer you are looking for a temperature of 140).
While the chicken is roasting make the sauce!  You can certainly make this sauce ahead of time.  It will last in the fridge for up to two weeks.  Begin by warming a medium pot over medium heat.  Add one tbs of olive oil and sauté the following: one jalapeño, minced, and one third cup of chopped onions.  Sauté until the vegetables become tender and the onion is translucent, about 10 minutes.  Add two cloves of garlic, finely minced, to the mix and stir for one minute until fragrant.  Now it is time for the piece de resistance: the Four Roses Small Batch.  Keeping the heat on medium, slowly add one cup of Four Roses to the pot.  This may flame up a bit, which is fine.  It is just the alcohol burning off.  Just be sure to go slowly and keep your face away from the pot.
Allow the bourbon to deglaze the pot, stirring and scraping the bottom with a wooden spoon.  Next up: the mustard!  Add one cup good quality yellow mustard to the Four Roses mixture, along with two tsp good quality dijon mustard.  Continue by adding the following: one half cup apple cider vinegar, one tsp ground cumin, one quarter tsp red pepper flakes, one tbs local Kentucky sorghum (local honey is a good substitute), two tbs brown sugar, one tsp Worcestershire sauce (Bourbon Barrel Foods’s Worcestershire sauce is my favorite), and one half tsp kosher salt.

Stir to combine and bring to a boil.  Once the sauce is boiling, drop the heat to medium-low and allow to simmer for twenty minutes, reducing the sauce and helping the flavors meld and concentrate.  Next, remove from the heat and strain the sauce through a fine sieve, separating out the jalapeño and onion and leaving you with a smooth, delicious barbecue sauce!
After the chicken has cooked for 35-40 minutes, remove from the oven and brush liberally with the bourbon-mustard sauce.  Drop the oven temperature to 350 degrees and put the chicken back in to roast for an additional 15 minutes.  The meat will finish cooking and the sauce will begin to set.  Remove from the oven and allow to rest for five to 10 minutes.  Serve along with additional bourbon-mustard on the side.  Enjoy!

A Chat with Johnny Iuzzini, the Dessert Master

May 28, 2014 by  

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Are you a lover of desserts? If so, then meet Johnny Iuzzini, who is to the dessert world what Shawn White is to snowboarding.  He is a master of this decadent craft and firmly solidified his place in the land of pastry after a decade of work at the renowned four star Jean Georges in NYC and countless accolades, including the prestigious James Beard award for Pastry Chef of the Year.

Add a touch of rebellion and a dollop of TV star power courtesy of Top Chef: Just Desserts (Johnny was the head judge) and one would likely feel a bit of nervous enthusiasm if given the chance to meet this rock-star of sweets, wouldn’t you say?  This is the state I found myself in when I was presented with the fortunate opportunity to interview Johnny during his recent trip to the Bluegrass for the Kentucky Derby.

Recently, we chatted about what drove him to the world of pastry in the first place.

Johnny started, as many young Chef’s do, working his way through the savory track at the Culinary Institute of America.  It was when he was training in a restaurant and was given the duty of killing the lobsters every morning in preparation for dinner service, that he found the Chef world loosing it’s luster.  His Mother was a generous and kind caregiver, particularly when it came to animals.  While he is not a vegetarian by any means, Johnny found that he couldn’t start each day in this manner and he saw a peacefulness in the Pastry Chefs surrounding him that lead him to request a change in his focus.

Clearly this was the right decision and Johnny’s career took off at an impressive rate.  He released his first book in 2008, Dessert FourPlay: Sweet Quartets from a Four-Star Pastry Chef and his second book, Sugar Rush, is due out this September (it is available for pre-order here).  As someone who is quite terrified of making desserts, this book seems almost made for me.

Johnny is breaking down the basics this time around, showing the reader how to build a base of pastry techniques and to grow from there, guiding you every step of the way with his expertise and charm.  This mastery and ease was every apparent in his cooking demo, where he prepared four different dishes, all of which were terribly impressive and addicting, not to mention shockingly approachable for the home cook.

I was particularly excited when I saw that strawberry shortcake was on the menu.  A favorite childhood dessert, Johnny puts a grown-up twist by bathing the fresh berries in balsamic vinegar, imparting a deeply rich sweetness that is further amplified after the berries bake for over an hour in a 200 degree oven.  The juices of the berries concentrate and intensify, calmed only by the cool cream which has been whipped to perfection, flecks of vanilla bean adding depth and structure.

A classic biscuit is split to hold all of this goodness, flakes of salt secured to the top during the baking process, adding that certain something to this absolutely flawless dessert.  Now, I wouldn’t dare claim that my biscuits are half as fluffy as Johnny’s or that my cream is whipped as lightly.  But I can attest to the impressiveness of this classic dish, the volume turned up in such a way that any home cook can master.  It was a fantastic evening and I am quite grateful to Macy’s Culinary Council for giving me the opportunity to meet Johnny Iuzzini.  My dessert inspiration has runneth over!  I may just have a sweet tooth after all…

It is hard to put into words how satisfying these roasted strawberries are and they couldn’t be easier to make.  Begin by cleaning and topping three pints of local strawberries (you can find them at any farmer’s market now and they are dramatically tastier than those found in the big-box groceries).  Slice the strawberries in half and place them in a large bowl.  Cover with balsamic vinegar and allow to sit for thirty minutes to one hour.

Preheat the oven to 200 degrees and place the strawberries, cut side down, in a single layer on a baking sheet.  Roast in the oven for an hour and a half until their color has deepened and they are soft but still hold their shape.  Remove from the oven and allow to cool to room temperature.

While the berries are soaking in the vinegar make your biscuit dough.  This was my first venture into the biscuit world and I know I have some work to do to master this craft.  That said, what I had anticipated to be a daunting task was actually quite simplistic.  The key to a perfect biscuit, as I’ve been told, is to be sure your butter, milk and eggs are all very cold.  Next time around I plan to cube my butter ahead of time and then place it back in the fridge to chill.  I found the warmth from my hands to have more of an effect on the butter than I anticipated and it became soft at the edges quickly.

To begin your biscuit dough, sift the following into the bowl of a food processor with the flat blade attached: two and one quarter cups all purpose flour, four teaspoons baking powder, one half teaspoon baking soda and one half teaspoon coarse salt.  Pulse several times to bring everything together.  Cut six tablespoons of cold butter into small cubes and add to the flour mixture.  Continue to pulse the blade until the butter breaks apart and turns into small pea-sized pieces (you want the butter to remain in small pieces, you do not want it to completely incorporate with the flour).

Whisk two thirds cup whole milk with one large egg until combined.  With the blade running, pour the milk and egg through the feed tube, continuing to pulse until the dough comes together and pulls into a ball (this will happen quickly and be careful not to over mix).

Lightly flour your counter and turn the dough out onto the surface.  Form into a square and cover in plastic wrap.  Set in the refrigerator for one hour.  Resting dough is an important aspect in just about any recipe.  It gives the glutens time to come together and develop and will result in a much more texturally pleasing biscuit/cookie/pizza, etc.  Preheat your oven to 425 while the dough is resting.

After one hour, remove from the refrigerator and place on a floured surface.  Roll the dough into a half-inch thick square.  Cut one and one-half inch square biscuits from the dough and place on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.  Brush the top of each biscuit with melted butter and sprinkle with pink salt (if you don’t have pink salt, another course salt will do fine).  Bake for five to ten minutes until they have puffed up and are golden brown.

While the biscuits are baking whip up the vanilla creme chantilly topping.  Pour one cup heavy cream, one cup creme fraiche, four tbs confectioners’ sugar and the seeds from one vanilla bean into a large bowl.  Whip until the cream is light and airy and forms stiff peaks.  Remove the biscuits from the oven, top with the whipped creme chantilly and slow roasted strawberries.  Garnish with fresh mint and serve.

Makes 12 Strawberry Shortcakes

Slow-Roasted Strawberries

  • three pints local strawberries
  • balsamic vinegar
Biscuits
  • two and one quarter cups all-purpose flour
  • four teaspoons baking powder
  • one half teaspoon baking soda
  • one half teaspoon course salt
  • six tbs butter, cut into small cubes and kept very cold
  • two thirds cup whole milk
  • one large egg, beaten
  • two tbs unsalted butter, melted
  • pink salt
Vanilla Creme Chantilly
  • one cup heavy cream
  • one cup creme fraiche
  • four tbs confectioners’ sugar
  • one vanilla bean, seeds scraped out and reserved
  • fresh mint leaves for garnish

Slow-Roasted Strawberries
Begin by cleaning and topping three pints of local strawberries (you can find them at any farmer’s market now and they are dramatically tastier than those found in the big-box groceries).  Slice the strawberries in half and place them in a large bowl.

Cover with balsamic vinegar and allow to sit for thirty minutes to one hour.
Preheat the oven to 200 degrees and place the strawberries, cut side down, in a single layer on a baking sheet.  Roast in the oven for an hour and a half until their color has deepened and they are soft but still hold their shape.  Remove from the oven and allow to cool to room temperature.

Biscuits
To begin your biscuit dough, sift the following into the bowl of a food processor with the flat blade attached: two and one quarter cups all purpose flour, four teaspoons baking powder, one half teaspoon baking soda and one half teaspoon coarse salt.  Pulse several times to bring everything together.  Cut six tablespoons of cold butter into small cubes and add to the flour mixture.  Continue to pulse the blade until the butter breaks apart and turns into small pea-sized pieces (you want the butter to remain in small pieces, you do not want it to completely incorporate with the flour).
Whisk two thirds cup whole milk with one large egg until combined.  With the blade running, pour the milk and egg through the feed tube, continuing to pulse until the dough comes together and pulls into a ball (this will happen quickly and be careful not to over mix).
Lightly flour your counter and turn the dough out onto the surface.  Form into a square and cover in plastic wrap.  Set in the refrigerator for one hour.  Resting dough is an important aspect in just about any recipe.
Preheat your oven to 425 while the dough is resting.  After one hour, remove from the refrigerator and place on a floured surface.  Roll the dough into a half-inch thick square.  Cut one and one-half inch square biscuits from the dough and place on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.  Brush the top of each biscuit with melted butter and sprinkle with pink salt (if you don’t have pink salt, another course salt will do fine).  Bake for five to ten minutes until they have puffed up and are golden brown.

Vanilla Creme Chantilly
Pour one cup heavy cream, one cup creme fraiche, four tbs confectioners’ sugar and the seeds from one vanilla bean into a large bowl.  Whip until the cream is light and airy and forms stiff peaks.  Remove the biscuits from the oven, top with the whipped creme chantilly and slow roasted strawberries.  Garnish with fresh mint and serve.

Louisville Kentucky: Proof on Main’s Bardstown Bellini

May 1, 2014 by  

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It is impossible to walk into 21c Museum Hotel and not be inspired.  I have the distinct privilege of calling this my workplace and on my very best days I am treated to the carefully curated delicacies turned out by Levon Wallace and the team at Proof on Main.  Levon’s deft hands craft beautifully creative dishes utilizing the very best the Bluegrass has to offer.

This artful and local approach extends to the bar where you will find over 75 bourbons, house-made tonic that you will want to take home by the jug-full, and a seasonal cocktail list that is as playful as it is sophisticated and delicious.

I am a sucker for any drink involving sparkling wine, so the Bardstown Bellini immediately caught my eye when it made it’s debut during National Bourbon Heritage Month this past September.  Bourbon + Peach + Prosecco.  What more could you want?  Bourbon and peaches are a natural combination and we all know the Italians got it right when they combined peach purée and Prosecco for the classic Bellini years ago.  On the surface it all seemed obvious and straightforward; however my first sip of this drink drew curiosity.

What was that essence rounding out the flavors, deepening the intensity and soothing my taste buds all at once?  Small black flecks danced across the top of the glass, seeds of a vanilla bean brought to the surface by the effervesce of the Prosecco.  Vanilla.

Who would have thought?  It is the vanilla that actually makes this drink.  It brings the peaches to life, excites the Prosecco and allows the bourbon to shine in all of it’s Kentucky glory.  This cocktail is the perfect alternative to a Mint Julep, taking the edge off and leaving no bite.  The Bardstown Billini will impress bourbon aficionados while turning those bourbon-shy individuals into instant fans of our native spirit.

Your Derby Day drink menu is complete.  Send the thank you card to Proof on Main.  Or better yet, hand-deliver it.  I hear their spring cocktail menu is fantastic…

 

This drink kicks off with the peach purée.  There isn’t much better than a fresh peach however when they are not in season the frozen variety will work just fine.  Defrost one bag of frozen peaches (12-16 ounces) and purée them in a blender until smooth.

Strain the peaches through a sieve, pressing down with the back of a spoon to extract all of the peach juice, while leaving any unwanted solids behind.  We are going to heat this purée on the stove, so I strain the peaches directly into a small pot.

Run your knife down the center of a vanilla bean, allowing the seeds to begin to escape from the pod.  I opened my vanilla pod up a fair amount but did not scrape all of the seeds out.  I wanted the vanilla to be a flavor enhancer and did not want it to take over the entire drink.

The vanilla bean will release plenty of flavor as it warms in the peach purée and several little flecks of vanilla will find their way into the mix.  This is really when it comes down to flavor preference, however, so feel free to scrape the seeds out of the pod and add them directly to the peach purée.

The peaches are tart and we need to coax the sweetness out of them.  We also want to thin out the purée.  Add one cup of water and one tbs of sugar to the peaches.  I fall on the savory side of the sweet spectrum, but taste as you go and add additional sugar if you feel the flavor is still too tart.  Every bag of peaches is going to be a bit different so taste and continue to season to your liking.

Turn the heat to high and stir until combined.  Once the mixture comes to a boil remove from the heat and set aside to cool to room temperature.

Bourbon time!  Fill a cocktail shaker with ice and add the following: two shots bourbon, two shots cooled peach purée, one shot orange juice and six dashes mango or peach bitters.  Regular bitters will work here as well but I recommend investing in a variety of flavored bitters.  They are very fun to play with and add great depth to cocktails!

Shake vigorously until well blended.  Pour into a champagne flute, top with Prosecco and enjoy.  Cheers and happy Derby!

Makes Two Drinks

  • one bag frozen peaches, defrosted (12-16 ounces)
  • one vanilla bean
  • one tbs sugar
  • one cup water
  • two shots bourbon
  • one shot orange juice
  • six dashes peach or mango bitters
  • Prosecco
Defrost one bag of frozen peaches (12-16 ounces) and purée them in a blender until smooth.   Strain the peaches through a sieve, pressing down with the back of a spoon to extract all of the peach juice, while leaving any unwanted solids behind.  We are going to heat this purée on the stove, so I strain the peaches directly into a small pot.   Run your knife down the center of a vanilla bean, allowing the seeds to begin to escape from the pod.  I opened my vanilla pod up a fair amount but did not scrape all of the seeds out.  
I wanted the vanilla to be a flavor enhancer and did not want it to take over the entire drink.  The vanilla bean will release plenty of flavor as it warms in the peach purée and several little flecks of vanilla will find their way into the mix.  This is really when it comes down to flavor preference, however, so feel free to scrape the seeds out of the pod and add them directly to the peach purée. 
 The peaches are tart and we need to coax the sweetness out of them.  We also want to thin out the purée.  Add one cup of water and one tbs of sugar to the peaches.  I fall on the savory side of the sweet spectrum, but taste as you go and add additional sugar if you feel the flavor is still too tart.  Every bag of peaches is going to be a bit different so taste and continue to season to your liking.
Turn the heat to high and stir until combined.  Once the mixture comes to a boil remove from the heat and set aside to cool to room temperature.
Fill a cocktail shaker with ice and add the following: two shots bourbon, two shots cooled peach purée, one shot orange juice and six dashes mango or peach bitters. Shake vigorously until well blended.  Pour into a champagne flute, top with Prosecco and enjoy.  Cheers and happy Derby!

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