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What You’ll Find at the Brooklyn Flea Market

August 29, 2014 by  

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  L1010084 Recently during a move, I suggested we check out the Brooklyn Flea Market with the sole purpose of finding the perfect nightstand. (Brooklyn Flea without purpose = disaster.  I love EVERYTHING.) There are 3 different locations: Fort Greene, Williamsburg, and Park Slope, and we chose Williamsburg because I also really wanted to drive through the Hasidic Jewish community while we were there. Seriously: such a fun Sunday afternoon!  Along with vintage clothing, furniture and more tchotchkes than you’d ever know what to do with, there were also tons of food vendors there selling anything you could possibly be craving.  Hibiscus donuts?  Done!!! L1010083 L1010089 L1010090 L1010093 L1010095 L1010096 L1010097 L1010094 In the end we did find the perfect nightstand: an old crate that I’ll turn on its side.  Of course the hubby was like #youpaidhowmuchforthatthing?!, but it was a fraction of what the furniture stores were charging. Plus: vintage!  And fun day Sunday!  Totes worth it:-) L1010092 L1010099

Have you ever been on a mission to find the perfect {insert random object here}?  If so, where did you end up finding it?  Share below!

     


Preparing For Your Trip To Vietnam, From Culture to Food & Adventure

August 29, 2014 by  

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Vietnam market Locals at a Vietnam market. Photo courtesy of Lucas Jans. Looking to travel to Vietnam? Vietnam expert and travel blogger of Discount Travel Blogger, Lyndsay Cabildo, shares her knowledge of the country, based on an 18-month backpacking trip through Southeast Asia in 2008 that led to her falling in love with Vietnam — especially how affordable it was — and living there for nine months. In 2011, she returned to the destination to backpack solo and teach English for three months. Cabildo shares advice and recommendations below on how to travel beyond the guidebook through this fascinating country. 1. For those wanting to have a Vietnam experience not typically found in guidebooks, a recommendation is Son Doong Cave, touted as the largest cave in the world. It might be a little expensive, but it’s truly an amazing cave. For a beach bum like me, Nha Trang was my favorite beach in Vietnam back in 2008; however, it has become crowded over time. Yet, there is Phu Quoc Island, a small island off the coast from Southern Vietnam, which might be a little pricey than the usual budget backpacker but it is beautiful and…

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Sonoma Wine Country Weekend Over Labor Day

August 29, 2014 by  

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Any plans to go to the West Coast over Labor Day Weekend? The Sonoma Wine Country Weekend is August 29 through 31, 2014, with winemaker events county-wide. For three delicious, decadent days, you can experience, up close and personal, Sonoma’s full bounty of flavors. Rub shoulders with winegrowers and makers from the pioneers to the rising stars. For example, the Taste of Sonoma takes place at MacMurray Ranch August 30, and the Sonoma Harvest Wine Auction is August 31 (alas! it’s already sold out). There are winemaker lunches, winemaker dinners and winemaker barbecues. Jointly produced by the Sonoma County Vintners and the Sonoma Valley Vintners & Growers Foundation, all proceeds benefit local charities. Since its inception, Sonoma Wine Country Weekend has raised over $12 million for charities that benefit students, children, farm workers and people in need in Sonoma County communities. (Photo courtesy of Sonoma Uncorked)


The Growth of Indian Culture, Trends & Style

August 27, 2014 by  

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They’re everywhere on American television, to the surprise of their compatriots. People of Indian origin have rapidly vaulted to the second largest ethnic minority on U.S. television, trailing only Spanish-speaking actors. With its influence rising, like the Good Wife’s Archie Panjabi pictured above, India is poised to become a culture and style trendsetter.
This trend can be traced all the way back the 60s, when The Beatles journeyed to India and became one of the first trendsetters to propagate such style influences as the sitar, nehru jackets and yoga, now practiced by more than 100 million people worldwide. An analysis of 106 popular TV shows, including a list provided by TV.com, suggests that 25 Indian and one Pakistani TV actor, rank only second to the 49 Hispanic- or Spanish-surnamed actors employed by this sample of TV shows. Parminder NagraParminder Nagra was one of the first British Indian actors to invade American television, starring in the medical drama ER for six years until the series ended in April 2009. She rose to international prominence in 2002 after starring in Bend It Like Beckham. Parminder Nagra who starred in the medical drama ER for six years, represents the…

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Cabaret On Broadway, as Good as Ever

August 14, 2014 by  

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Cabaret01_605x329 “What good is sitting alone in your room? Come, hear the music play. Life is a cabaret, old chum, come to the cabaret!”
An iconic invitation, how can you resist? Even with MY froggy vocals doing the inviting! Over the years, I have heeded this call. This is my 3rd visit to a revival of “Cabaret” and I can assure you that like good wine, it improves with age. This is a vintage year. “Cabaret” revolves around the residents of  Berlin during the heyday of Weimar Germany – after WWI, during the decade leading to WWII – a dizzying era, shocking even by today’s standards. Berliners lived like they would never see tomorrow; as if everyday were their last. Hedonism became a religion and personal pleasure the ultimate goal while the overt rumblings of an imminent war underscored (and ultimately dominated) not only the stages of dim nightclubs, but darkened the world stage.  Berlin’s vibrant, grimy, and divinely low cabaret scene was an experience that history will never repeat. Be prepared for some chilling scenes as hedonism gives way to Nazism and the theaters of war. “Cabaret” as we now know it has morphed, evolved and been adapted in…

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A New Heart for Paris – the Renovation of the Forum des Halles Shopping Centre

August 12, 2014 by  

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My wife grew up in the Centre of Paris and can recall going to Les Halles with her grandmother to gather up leftover flowers from the flower wholesale market. My son played in the parks there every other day, my wife takes a framing course there, and I go shopping in the mall about once a week. All that is to show that Les Halles has been an important part of my neighborhood in Paris, and I care about what happens to it. Les Halles  (The Halls) was the wholesale food market until 1969 when the pressures associated with delivering enough food everyday to feed Paris became overwhelming and a decision was made to relocate the wholesale market to the outskirts of Paris. The cast iron structures of the old Halls were largely demolished and an enormous hole was dug to construct what would become the central hub of the future RER transportation system. As Parisians are apt to do whenever a new project is announced, much discussion occurred over the construction details , particularly as far as the public utilization was concerned, to the point that “the hole of the Halls” as it became known…

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A Summer Moment at MOMA’s Sculpture Garden

August 4, 2014 by  

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  On a recent visit to the MOMA, I noticed the queuing system had changed…it seemed they were only checking tickets to go upstairs, rather than also on the ground floor of the museum…the floor that houses the sculpture garden.  I asked at the information desk, and sure enough, the garden is now free to the general public during all museum hours. Besides just being a lovely place to sit with a good book (and goodness knows we need all the green space we can get in Midtown!), the garden is also home to pieces by some names you’ve probably heard once or twice…Picasso and Matisse ring a bell?  Here’s a few of my favorite shots from the inside. L1010013 L1010017   L1010022  L1010024 L1010027 L1010029 L1010031 L1010038 L1010018 L1010023 L1010021

Do you have a local garden you frequent?  Share below!

       


Indian Filmmaking, Satyajit Ray + The World of Apu

August 2, 2014 by  

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The World of Apu, Satyajit Ray, India, film, cinema, Bengal, Bengali There are two scenes in the Satyajit Ray film The World of Apu (Apur Sansar, 1959) that sent me into the bathroom crying at the end of the film. One has to do with the birth of Apu’s son, and the other, the last scene of the movie, when they reconcile. More than that I don’t want to tell you if you haven’t scene this classic of world cinema. When I came out of the stall, tears still wetting my face, I struck up a conversation with a white-haired woman who had a kind and gentle face. I knew immediately she was someone I could cry in front of, and indeed she understood, she had just seen the same film.
Not to have seen the films of Ray would mean existing in a world without the sun or the moon. – Akira Kurosawa
Carol and I were to see each other several times more as we were both attending the same film series at Toronto International Film Festival headquarters, the TIFF Bell Lightbox. The Sun and The Moon: The Films of Satyajit Ray is a…

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