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Paddy Campbell’s Wet House at London’s Soho Theatre

November 23, 2014 by  

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I heard word that Paddy Campbell’s award winning play “The Wet House” was on in Soho Theatre, London while I happened to be passing through so I got a few tickets and off we went. paddy campbell play It was a busy week for me in London and Windsor. I toured Windsor Castle and took in a lot of pubs. I had a Guinness and a Shamrock Pie. I felt that seeing a play by a guy named Paddy, anything with an Irish connection would be a good mood sitter. Friends, Sandra and Neil, joined me after a mad dash from work for the play. Wet House is a drama based on real life experiences of staying and working in a hostel for recovering alcoholics, drug attics [sic], single mothers, sex offenders and anyone who needs some rehab or a home to try and help cope with problems they have in life. Hostels like this really exist, and alcohol is permitted inside, hence the title Wet House. Paddy Campbell the writer has based the play on real life experiences and you can tell this in an instant. A raw, real

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Sculpteo 3D Printing Engine Will Replicate You In Miniature

November 22, 2014 by  

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For those in the technology “know,” you have seen that there’s been significant advances in 3D printing lately, a prototyping process that makes it possible to create an actual object from a 3D file. The object is formed by applying successive layers of solid material. This fall in Paris, I attended an event called Digital Day, which was a conference focused on an interactive discussion around the latest in technology and innovation largely from French start-ups. The event held workshops and vendors participated in an area where they showed up their latest. I was fascinated by Sculpteo, who has offices in both Paris and San Francisco. On-site, they had a machine which scanned YOU and then from that scan, was able to create a 3D object of yourself. And so, of course I did this, how could I not?  Below I’m standing in the machine as I wait for it to circle around me and scan my body. Above, the engineer is at work as the image of me comes up on the screen in real time. As it formulates what it needs of my body, I watch in…

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Walking Through Tokyo’s Cultural & Very Alive Shinjuku District

November 22, 2014 by  

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I was told about the Shinjuku (新宿) district when I first arrived in Tokyo, but didn’t have an opportunity to explores its streets until my last two days in Tokyo. The sprawling area is one of the 23 city wards of Tokyo and located in the central western part of Tokyo. It is commonly known as one of the city’s largest and most happening entertainment, business and shopping area. Everything is pretty much a stone’s throw from Shinjuku Station, which btw, is the world’s busiest railway station, handling over two million passengers every day. It is served by about a dozen railway and subway lines, including the JR Yamanote Line and is also one of Tokyo’s major stops for long-distance highway buses and city buses. Whoah Nelly is right. I was lost on more than one occasion and I found myself there by foot on both occasions. The city streets are sprawling with bustling crowds and everyone appears to be in a hurry, except for the random teenager you run across who might be off in a corner texting his girlfriend for the fifteenth time in the last five minutes. Billboards are massive and…

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Annette Conlon Reclaims Her Voice on ‘Life, Death and the Spaces Between’

November 19, 2014 by  

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I’ve known songwriter Annette Conlon for nearly as long as I’ve been recording music. The Los Angeles based artist has long been an avid support of other artists as the host of ‘Nette Radio, ‘one of the longest running radio shows dedicated to promoting women in music.’  She’s also hosted many a songwriter showcase over the years and collaborated with her husband in duo The Conlons.
But after a harrowing few years of health challenges, Annette is putting her own voice front and center, embarking on a solo project inspired by the events she’s weathered, “Life, Death and The Spaces Between.” Amidst a crowdfunding campaign to support the project and some unexpected family events, Annette discussed her road to healing and writing her most inspired material.

Q: You’ve been so active in music, I didn’t realize you hadn’t recorded your own solo work. How did you know it was time?
Annette Conlon: I fell and hit my head on a trashcan on April 17, 2014. I suffered a pretty


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Central Japan’s Kyoto Exudes Charm & Beauty

November 19, 2014 by  

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I had heard about Kyoto from countless travelers over the years, and with such passion that most would say leave Tokyo behind if you had limited time and just explore the north, taking in as much Kyoto as you can. It depends on who you talk to of course, however Kyoto is certainly a place that draws the crowds because of his historical and cultural past and the fact that it is stunningly beautiful. When you imagine Japan, you think of its remarkable Shinto shrines, Zen temples and sublime Zen gardens, with geisha in abundance, and beautifully colored robes and umbrellas on every corner. Kyoto is a bit like that, but with modern influences throughout. Kyoto is located in the central part of the island of Honshu, Japan. I didn’t get there the way most might on a more traditional tour of Japan, which would be a bullet train from Tokyo or one of the direct buses. I landed via ship at the port of Maizuru in central Japan on the west coast and from there, took a bus to various parts of Kyoto, which included shrines and temples. For a…

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Getting Oh So Distracted in Paris

November 18, 2014 by  

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In three short days I managed to fall in love with Paris yet again.  My original goal in going to Paris was to do the two things I had never done before on my previous 3 trips to Paris – go to the Louvre and Versailles.  However,  I ended up doing neither!  I guess I got distracted – but that’s easy to do in Paris. Instead I walked around my neighborhood I was staying in, sat at cafes, ate crepes and sipped espressos.   Plus – I had to be honest with myself – as much as I love photographing the outside of the Louvre, I’m not that interested in the art inside.  Instead I went to view the art I love – the contemporary collection at the Pompidou center.  So lest you think that I’m a complete culture-phobe – at least I did go inside a museum in Paris. Besides museums, I also took in some cabaret and delicious decadent chocolate and French pastries.  One morning I chased the fog to the Eiffel Tower to get a shot of the tower in the clouds. And I also played metro roulette and rode a line out for a ways and then…

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Tokyo’s Very Authentic Asakusa Market & Taikokan Drum Museum

November 18, 2014 by  

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Asakusa is fairly well known to travelers heading to Tokyo — if it doesn’t come up in your research, I’d be surprised. Locals also recommend this as a stopping place, largely because its market spreads across several streets in the Asakusa area in the north of Tokyo. Easily accessible, it’s a place you can get to via subway and be suddenly transferred from modern urban Tokyo to the more traditional classic cultural side of the city’s culture. While the Sensoji Temple and Nezu Jinja Shrine is nearby and another major draw for people heading to Asakusa for the day, the Asakusa Market has enough eye candy to keep even the most prolific type A personality engaged for hours. You’ll notice immediately upon exploring Asakusa is its feeling of ‘traditional’ and ‘old’, especially when you take a meander through the countless side streets off the main shopping drag. Here, you’ll not discover Japanese homes, which are hundreds of years old, but also deteriorating shacks and rusty steel buildings. The Taikokan Drum Museum is also nearby which is worth stopping at if only to see their 6.5 feet tall drum that will run you around $60,000. In addition to drums, they…

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Taking in the Best of Quito Culture

November 14, 2014 by  

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I spent four days in Quito and while I could have easily stayed another few more, it’s very possible to tour the city in three days (two if you’re really fast). I didn’t pack too much into each day because from my experience, this just leads to frustration if I don’t check all the items off my list. At the end of this post I’ve suggested a few more activities for different interests. In general, I suggest exploring a few of Quito’s neighborhoods because they vary in terms of architectural styles. For history and culture, visit the Old Town and for nightlife and shopping head to Plaza Foch. How to Tour Quito in 3 Days

Day 1: Get your bearings and your view

Explore Old Town and La Ronda neighborhood: The Old Town is one of the best examples of colonial architecture and it really shows. The buildings are well-preserved yet hardly-altered from their original state and they are very colorful side by side. In my case, I stayed at La Casona de la Ronda so I had easy access to the historic Old Town. Even if you’re staying at a hotel…

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