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Sculpteo 3D Printing Engine Will Replicate You In Miniature

November 22, 2014 by  

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For those in the technology “know,” you have seen that there’s been significant advances in 3D printing lately, a prototyping process that makes it possible to create an actual object from a 3D file. The object is formed by applying successive layers of solid material. This fall in Paris, I attended an event called Digital Day, which was a conference focused on an interactive discussion around the latest in technology and innovation largely from French start-ups. The event held workshops and vendors participated in an area where they showed up their latest. I was fascinated by Sculpteo, who has offices in both Paris and San Francisco. On-site, they had a machine which scanned YOU and then from that scan, was able to create a 3D object of yourself. And so, of course I did this, how could I not?  Below I’m standing in the machine as I wait for it to circle around me and scan my body. Above, the engineer is at work as the image of me comes up on the screen in real time. As it formulates what it needs of my body, I watch in…

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Annette Conlon Reclaims Her Voice on ‘Life, Death and the Spaces Between’

November 19, 2014 by  

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I’ve known songwriter Annette Conlon for nearly as long as I’ve been recording music. The Los Angeles based artist has long been an avid support of other artists as the host of ‘Nette Radio, ‘one of the longest running radio shows dedicated to promoting women in music.’  She’s also hosted many a songwriter showcase over the years and collaborated with her husband in duo The Conlons.
But after a harrowing few years of health challenges, Annette is putting her own voice front and center, embarking on a solo project inspired by the events she’s weathered, “Life, Death and The Spaces Between.” Amidst a crowdfunding campaign to support the project and some unexpected family events, Annette discussed her road to healing and writing her most inspired material.

Q: You’ve been so active in music, I didn’t realize you hadn’t recorded your own solo work. How did you know it was time?
Annette Conlon: I fell and hit my head on a trashcan on April 17, 2014. I suffered a pretty


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Central Japan’s Kyoto Exudes Charm & Beauty

November 19, 2014 by  

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I had heard about Kyoto from countless travelers over the years, and with such passion that most would say leave Tokyo behind if you had limited time and just explore the north, taking in as much Kyoto as you can. It depends on who you talk to of course, however Kyoto is certainly a place that draws the crowds because of his historical and cultural past and the fact that it is stunningly beautiful. When you imagine Japan, you think of its remarkable Shinto shrines, Zen temples and sublime Zen gardens, with geisha in abundance, and beautifully colored robes and umbrellas on every corner. Kyoto is a bit like that, but with modern influences throughout. Kyoto is located in the central part of the island of Honshu, Japan. I didn’t get there the way most might on a more traditional tour of Japan, which would be a bullet train from Tokyo or one of the direct buses. I landed via ship at the port of Maizuru in central Japan on the west coast and from there, took a bus to various parts of Kyoto, which included shrines and temples. For a…

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Tokyo’s Very Authentic Asakusa Market & Taikokan Drum Museum

November 18, 2014 by  

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Asakusa is fairly well known to travelers heading to Tokyo — if it doesn’t come up in your research, I’d be surprised. Locals also recommend this as a stopping place, largely because its market spreads across several streets in the Asakusa area in the north of Tokyo. Easily accessible, it’s a place you can get to via subway and be suddenly transferred from modern urban Tokyo to the more traditional classic cultural side of the city’s culture. While the Sensoji Temple and Nezu Jinja Shrine is nearby and another major draw for people heading to Asakusa for the day, the Asakusa Market has enough eye candy to keep even the most prolific type A personality engaged for hours. You’ll notice immediately upon exploring Asakusa is its feeling of ‘traditional’ and ‘old’, especially when you take a meander through the countless side streets off the main shopping drag. Here, you’ll not discover Japanese homes, which are hundreds of years old, but also deteriorating shacks and rusty steel buildings. The Taikokan Drum Museum is also nearby which is worth stopping at if only to see their 6.5 feet tall drum that will run you around $60,000. In addition to drums, they…

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The Comprehensive Quirky & Cultural Guide to Tokyo

November 14, 2014 by  

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I spent a few weeks in Tokyo over the summer, the well recognized global city most frequent travelers have been to more than once. For this well-traveled chica, it was my first trip, largely since I had been told for years how hard it is to get around as well as how expensive it is to get around. People also talked about the language barrier and truth be told, none of these stereotypes should scare a long time traveler and for some reason, between the stories and the radiation in the north, I put Japan on hold for awhile. In just a few days, after nearly losing my cool getting lost five times in Shibuya’s massive maze of a station, I fell in love with this renowned global Asian city. First of all, a few surprises for the record. Formal But Genuine Friendliness: I was astonished how friendly people were despite the language barrier. Regardless of whether I was pointing to my map trying to get directions from a subway station to a restaurant or shop, or simply saying hello, I was greeted by a warm smile and a concerted effort to…

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The Global Mall in Taiwan and the “Big Ball”

November 14, 2014 by  

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We recently went to the new Global Mall and what we have come to call, “the big ball.”  This big ball, made in Taiwan, is a round display that was all the rage way back when it went on display in Shanghai where it caused quite a stir.  No one had seen anything like it.  Now, years later, this round display is in a purpose-built building that is part of the Global Mall complex. The Taiwan Pavilion The Global Mall is one of the most interesting, if not strangest malls I’ve ever visited.  There are odd spaces that have become stores, and it somehow all makes sense.  But there are hardly any customers, since it is so new. The Taiwan Pavilion This part of the mall is a 2-floor structure. The Taiwan Pavilion This is the start of the show.  For some reason, the designers want to give you the feeling of being in space.  So, visitors are supposed to step on these pads and look at themselves in the corresponding monitor across from them.  The monitor…

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Oh Dublin, My Dublin, How Thee Keeps Changing On Me

November 8, 2014 by  

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I missed coming over the pond last year….you know, that cold Atlantic Ocean pond that divides America’s East Coast and the United Kingdom. Whenever I return to England or Ireland, I always feel as if I’m coming home when the plane hits her soil and yet, things are remarkably different each and every time despite the fact that thankfully some things will probably never change. The people’s warmth and hospitality in Ireland is something that never seems to change nor their quirky sense of humor. It’s astonishing but I find myself laughing at the strangest things, usually within an hour of landing in Dublin. Conversations that were so familiar from years gone past start to fade away although they vividly come up in my mind whenever I’m sitting in a coffee bar thinking of my days as a student in London. While the Irish are notably different from the English, there are those odd and random things that make me feel as if I’m transported back, such as the proliferation of pubs on every corner, a Boots Pharmacy on every High Street, the familiar roundabouts and the mishmash of construction without signs or notification and yet…

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5,000 Pumpkins Come Alive at The Great Jack O’Lantern BLAZE

November 6, 2014 by  

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Since we’ve been expanding our coverage of New York City and the greater New York area this year, including Long Island and Westchester and Duchess Counties, I came across an incredible family event in Croton-on-Hudson called The Great Jack O’Lantern Blaze. The theme is Halloween and all things Autumn. Continuing for a record of 28 selected evenings through mid November, The Great Jack O’ Lantern Blaze is Hudson Valley’s biggest all-ages Halloween extravaganza. A team of artists comes together to carve thousands of jacks, many fused together in elaborate constructions such as life-size dinosaurs and eight-foot-tall working jack-o’lanterns-in-the-box, all lit up throughout the wooded walkways, orchards, and gardens of historic Van Cortlandt Manor. Carving of the art pumpkins begins in June and carving of the regular pumpkins begins in late September and continues throughout the run of the event, which ends on November 16. Some are harder to carve than others, such as the optical illusions and celtic knots, which can take an expert carver a full day to complete. We saw a number of complicated carvings that ranged from dinosaurs, spider web, mushrooms, witches, dinosaurs, lions, monkeys, a giraffe, a big snake, gorilla, a birthday…

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