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INK Women Event in Mumbai on March 8

March 6, 2014 by  

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Since INK started four years ago, INK has built an impressive global community of changemakers and thinkers. With so many incredible women who deserve to be in the spotlight, it only felt right to give these women their own platform to connect, share, and learn, and that is how INK Women was born. INK Women celebrates the struggles, triumphs, and passions of women. The program will connect women with cutting edge technology and ideas, presented by speakers from a variety of professional and personal backgrounds. From women working with women’s issues such as public health and safety, to women at the top of their field, be it finance, science, medicine, or fashion, will come together under the same roof at INK Women. It will be held in Mumbai India on March 8, 2014. INK Women 2014
NCPA, Mumbai
March 8th, 2014

More Info: inktalks.com/events/inkwomen2014


Protests in Thailand: What It All Means!

January 27, 2014 by  

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Bangkok, Thailand Protest I was relaxing in the Asiana Lounge at Seoul’s Incheon International Airport Friday evening, waiting to board a flight to Bangkok, when the news report came on. “Dozens of people were injured by the explosions,” the anchor said dramatically, “which are the latest chapter in a wave of dangerous protests that have taken the Thai capital hostage since November.” “You scared?” One of my fellow passengers asked. I shook my head and took another swig of chardonnay. See, if travel has taught me one thing – or, more accurately, if it has reinforced one thing I’ve always known – it’s that members of the mainstream media, in their quest to hold the greatest share of the world’s TV consumers captive, use fear at their primary weapon, often at the expense of the truth. To be sure, I visited Egypt just after the 2011 revolution, Greece at the height of its economic collapse, Myanmar before it was officially open to outsiders and The Palestinian Territories…well, according to the powers that be, it’s never a good idea to go there. In each of these instances, I was not only not harmed, but found the…

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Leader in Chinese Cultural Revolution Apologizes for Past

December 16, 2013 by  

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It’s not often we get a window into the past and a glimmer of a person’s inner thoughts, but an article on a regretful leader of the Mao’s Cultural Revolution (International NY Times) allowed us just that insight. Indeed, a public apology to his fellow citizens for past wrongs, in a culture that reveres face and maintaining a public profile of dignity and honor, is a powerful admission. Chen Xiaolu, a onetime student leader during the Revolution is one of several who have made such a public confession in an effort to move beyond this past blight. It is a remarkable act in his culture; an action taken because many feel the imperative to de-romanticize the past.
Do you think that his confession will create a more realistic view of this time in history? Do you think it says anything significant about face and saving face in China?


A Tribute To Nelson Mandela While Reflecting On My South African Journey

December 6, 2013 by  

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I write today with great sadness after learning about the passing of Nelson Mandela this week. You see, I have a long history with South Africa and every time she graced me with another memory, I was forever changed. Her imprint wasn’t the kind of imprint other country destinations leave; it was if South Africa’s spirit spoke to me each and every time, as if she had to teach me something larger than myself…a bit like Mandela did over the course of his lifetime… Nelson-Mandela As I reflect on Mandela’s impact and his important life work, I began thinking of all the talks I have heard him give including a dramatic one in person in the 1990s, and zeroed in my own South African story, one which he influenced by his actions, his courage, his resilience and his solitude. He changed how I absorbed not just culture, politics and history, but how I viewed humanity and the world. My story goes deep. Endure me on an important life journey for a moment, starting in a pre-Mandela world. Apartheid was still very much in place when I lived in South Africa as a foreign exchange student in 1984,…

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Emerge America Helps Women Get Elected & Have a Political Voice

November 13, 2013 by  

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I recently learned about Emerge America, an organization which is changing the face of American politics by identifying, training and encouraging women to run for office, get elected and to seek higher office. I had an opportunity to meet the Emerge America founder Andrea Dew Steele, who in addition to her work to grow Emerge groups in more and more states, serves as the director of the California Committee North at Human Rights Watch. Prior to moving to the west coast, she worked for many years learning the Washington D.C. landscape in fundraising and doing policy work for Democratic candidates. The organization offers an intensive, cohort-based seven-month training program for women interested in getting into politics. As the number of elected Democratic women remains flat or even declines, the need for their work is growing across the country. Emerge America currently works in 14 states: Arizona, California, Colorado, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oregon, Vermont, Virginia, and Wisconsin. Emerge America’s role is to serve the states where they work, open new state programs and to build capacity to train more women in each of their current…

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La Luna: Much More Than a Punta Arenas Restaurant in Southern Chile

November 6, 2013 by  

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I discovered La Luna Restaurant by accident while I was staying in Punta Arenas in southern Chile recently. The place apparently has a history and it isn’t just about food. The founders and owners of La Luna are Sr. Mario Navarro and his wife Sra. Marjorie Kusch. They were both the founders of the legendary “Café del Cerro” in 1982, which was designed to be a landmark in the cultural struggle against the military dictatorship of Chile in the 1980′s. This cultural and music center was one of the pioneering spots and highlight of the Barrio Bellavista until 1991. Remember that there were serious riots in Paris in the late sixties over the Chilean political situation as well as in other pockets of the world. In 1970, they elected a Marxist president in Chile and 3 years later they had a coup. The poet Pablo Aniella used to belong to the communist party and there is no shortage of poetry and movies (Il Positino — the Italian movie based on a Chilean novel and his experience of his exile from Chile in the 1950′s) documenting this era. Locals who are…

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Saudi Women Take To The Streets To Defy De Facto Ban On Driving By Women

October 28, 2013 by  

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According to a recent write up in Wall Street Journal who reported on the incident, dozens of Saudi women took to the roads around Saudi Arabia on Saturday October 26, 2013, defying a new surge of warnings from the government, mosque pulpits and radio channels to drop their challenge to a de facto ban on driving by women. By mid-afternoon Saturday, about 40 women had defied the ban by driving in cities around the kingdom, according to their text messages and emails to other supporters of a recently-revived grassroots campaign for the legalization of Saudi women’s driving. A half-dozen posted videos online purportedly showing themselves driving Saturday. Although no law explicitly prohibits women from driving in Saudi Arabia, the government has refused to give them licenses. Campaign organizers had set Saturday as a main day for women drivers to challenge the ban by driving themselves about on errands. In total, more than 100 women countrywide have reported taking the wheel since women revived a more than two-decade effort to roll back Saudi Arabia’s prohibition on women’s driving, according to Eman al-Nafjan, a supporter of the campaign in the capital, Riyadh. Videos posted on YouTube this week…

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Syed Ansar Abbas: Inspiration in Pakistan

October 25, 2013 by  

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Pakistan has been a hotbed of terrorism and militancy for almost a decade now. In this period of time, more than 50,000 people have become victims of terrorism with the north western areas being especially vulnerable to militancy and bloodshed. Many Pakistanis see the country’s future as dark and hopeless, however, Ansar Abbas is not one of them. Below, Ansar Abbas uses his computer with his feet after losing his arms in a tragic suicide attack. Syed Ansar Abbas, aged 30, is one of the many victims of terrorism that has plagued Pakistan. He lost both his arms in a suicide attack in Dera Ismail Khan. However, despite such a grave and life-altering tragedy, he is still hopeful and passionate about the days to come. With an indomitable spirit he says, “I don’t like to be labelled as disabled or a victim”. Currently working as a news editor with a news agency in Pakistan, Ansar is pursuing his career confidently and hopes to make Pakistan a better country. He also worked as a field monitor in DI Khan for PakVotes for the recently concluded by-elections. The life of Ansar Abbas is a true story of hope and…

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