Jump to Content Area

Tech

Page 2

Taking a Look at Unusual Consumer Tech Products Over 6 Years

January 16, 2015 by  

Share:
Silentium comfort shell Intel Free Press takes a look at some of the oddest tech from the past six years at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas – by Intel Free Press. CES 2015: Racing into Silence At this year’s CES people could enter the “shell of silence,” Silentium’s Comfort-Shell (above). “It basically looks like a giant, white version of those spiky shells that Lakitu throws in the original Mario,” wrote Jacob Kastrenakes on The Verge. Despite its odd looks, any way to deaden the noise that is characteristic of CES is a blessing. Lambo2 CES had plenty of smartphones, the Tonino Lamborghini 88 Tauri phone definitely drew attention for its race car inspired design and its price tag. Revving in at $6000 and in scarce supply, its design turned a few heads but left others scratching theirs. “With a stitched leather finish that’s the real deal and gold-plated stainless steel surrounding this phone, you’re bound to stand out in the crowd if you’re crazy enough to even want to pay $6,000 for pure stupidity,” said The Verge’s Tom Warren. CES 2014: Helping the body? Some design…

Read more…


Voyeurism+, Where Selfies Take Center Stage in Our Lives

January 13, 2015 by  

Share:
 
Smartphone cameras unleashed a major trend around the globe — “selfie” — the act of taking photographs of one self in various states of dress or undress. Paying the ultimate tribute, The Oxford University Press named selfie 2013 word of the year.
Selfies are part of the voyeurgasm ubertrend, a societal trait that is being accelerated by the rapid improvement in tools that enable voyeurism, like the smartphone. Apple’s iPhone 4 gave self-portraits a big shot in the arm with the inclusion of a front-facing camera, although, today, many selfies are taken using a mirror. But now the smartphone has gained an ally to help celebrate instant narcissism, in the form of the selfie stick. That a telescoping wand designed to help smartphone users take better photos of themselves would be hailed by Time magazine as one of the best inventions of 2014 is indicative of the far-reaching impact Voyeurgasm is having on society. From The New York Times to The Verge to USA Today, everyone seems riveted by the selfie phenom and, pardon the pun, its selfie-stick growth curve:
  • Market growth – The New York Times ruefully suggests that “the séance with the self is only going


Read more…


CES 2015 Wrap: From UHD & Connected Objects to Digital Health & All Things 3D

January 12, 2015 by  

Share:
There was no shortage of companies jumping on the “we must be connected to everything, or else..” trend that was central to most announcements coming out of this year’s  Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas last week, an event that I’ve been going to for a couple of decades. It was even the heart of Samsung’s keynote address this year.  At the Las Vegas Convention Center (LVCC), the main building for CES’s heftiest exhibitors, it was Samsung (not Apple) who stole the show with its ever so impressive 360 screens that circled around its booth, showing flashy and compelling videos of cars racing and more. It was all about their 4K TVs, which are bendable, flat and curved although Samsung had plenty to offer in the mobile, audio and home automation space as well. Samsung JS9500 series is a new concept in UHD (4K technology), which they tout as eco-friendly. It uses nano-crystal technology and an intelligent SUHD re-mastering picture quality engine, which gives vast improvements in contrast, brightness, color reproduction, and detail. People seemed to be raving about FLIR at my evening networking events, a new infrared…

Read more…


CES 2015 & Fashion Sense: Wearables Need to be Invisibles

January 8, 2015 by  

Share:
2015 01 07 13 13 04 The Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas is featuring a lot of “wearables” reports Techcrunch (above) (which all seem to be smart watches). Foremski’s Take: All the fuss over Apple Watch will certainly help sell a lot of watches – regular and smart. I recently started wearing a normal watch. I like the watch, not because I can look up the time but I like the way it looks. And that’s a decision based on personal style. I might decide in a few months to stop wearing it. A decision that has nothing to do with the performance of the watch. And that’s why “wearables” need to become separated from the whims of personal style and fashion and disappear into the fabric of our lives. If our personal technologies become invisible no longer become objects of fashion — they can last longer than a season, and manufacturers can worry about the tech and not about becoming unfashionable. Also, if our personal technologies become invisible they longer create the same social problems with others, such as those encountered by Google Glass wearers. But “invisibles” won’t come from a company such…

Read more…


Brain Age: Why Do We Forget Things Even Early in Life?

January 1, 2015 by  

Share:
 
Incidences are becoming numerous. You’re about to mention a name and suddenly realize you can’t recall it. “It’s at the tip of my tongue,” you mutter embarrassedly. “Happens to me all time,” a sympathetic listener responds. You suffer from “mild cognitive impairment.” And so do billions of others.
While one could easily dismiss this as a collective “senior moment,” society is facing something never experienced before: a non-stop assault on the senses brought on by rivers of data, a proliferation of media and advertising, copious multitasking, plus a growing reliance on digital devices with memory aids:
  • Age – Scientists note that average scores on memory tests decline steadily after age 25. By midlife, memory erosion accelerates, with humans losing on average 1% of brain volume each year. And there’s growing evidence that cellphones, calculators, speed-dialing, GPS and other memory-saving aids have reduced the need for mental acuity, causing memory to deteriorate at a faster pace than ever before. A study led by Betsy Sparrow, an assistant professor of psychology at Columbia, found that people were significantly more likely to remember information if they thought they would not be able to find it later on the internet. A study


Read more…


The Growth of LED Lighting

December 30, 2014 by  

Share:
     
The opening ceremonies at the Beijing Olympics will always conjure up stunning imagery of 2,008 volunteers drumming in perfect harmony, an event that vividly captured the imagination of viewers worldwide. But if anything, this Olympic event was a coming out party for light-emitting diode, or LED lighting technology.
The opening ceremonies featured a giant 44,000 LED “scroll” that replayed China’s 5,000-year civilization on a canvas 482 feet (147 m) long and 72 feet (22 m) wide. Tiny LED beads were also embedded in the costumes of performers, who fanned out to create a starry sky with dazzling images. Philips Personal Wireless Lighting Philips offers the innovative hue Personal Wireless Lighting starter pack ($200) — three LED lightbulbs that can be wirelessly controlled by your Android smartphone, iPhone or iPad and features energy savings plus the ability to glow in 16 million colors. There’s no question that LED lighting has quickly achieved cult status in the staid $17 billion U.S. lightbulb replacement industry. The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 contained a little-noticed act. Starting in 2012, light bulbs are to be phased in that feature roughly 25% greater efficiency. This move…

Read more…


Growth of Drones Will Soon See Blue Skies Full of Them…

December 22, 2014 by  

Share:
Dronefield The word “drone” often conjures up images of autonomous, militarized technology. But in the context of small aircraft with multiple rotors that you often see carrying cameras, drones are more accurately associated with hobbyist sport and commercial applications. They’ve begun attracting mainstream attention as drone makers such as Parrot introduced affordable models putting them in the hands of a broader range of buyers. The giant Las Vegas International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) has for the first time, created a dedicated  Unmanned Systems Marketplace, where over a dozen companies will be grouped together to show off their latest flying machines. According to the Consumer Electronics Association, sales of consumer drones are predicted to reach 400,000 units and $130 million in revenue in 2015, and surpass $1 billion in annual sales within the next five years. Drones’ affordability and their extraordinary flying agility is directly related to Moore’s Law and lower costs for powerful chips. Drones are complex systems requiring precise control of multiple rotors and positioning in three dimensions. Sensors feed data to a microprocessor, which decides on the rate of spin for the individual rotors, clockwise…

Read more…


How Drones Can Be Used To Find You In the Remotest of Places…

December 20, 2014 by  

Share:
Last summer, a Wisconsin search effort was under way to find 82-year-old Guillermo DeVenecia, a missing ophthalmologist who suffers from dementia. After a three-day effort involving search dogs, a helicopter and hundreds of people, DeVenecia was found by a consumer drone.
David Lesh uses his drone to shoot videos for his Colorado ski and snowboard business but decided to help with the search while visiting his girlfriend. It’s stories like these that provide an inkling of our future, one where drones will play a prominent role in many aspects of life. What is truly remarkable is that this scenario played out just four years after the introduction of the first consumer drone that helped mainstream the category. At the January 2010 CES, Paris-based Parrot S.A. introduced the AR.Drone, a $300 quadcopter equipped with a video camera and controlled by an iPhone. Parrot Bebop Parrot was the drone trendsetter, launching the first consumer drone in January 2010. Its latest state-of-the-art model is the Bebop drone, which retails for $500. Once considered a toy, drones, which are also called UAVs or unmanned aerial vehicles, have blossomed into powerful aerial video tools that are reshaping many industries and…

Read more…


« Previous PageNext Page »